Stay on the beaten path! Go with the crowd! Go with the flow! Don’t rock the boat!

All our lives we have heard these phrases uttered by well-meaning parents, teachers and respected adults. It’s time to go rogue. Break all the rules.

 

Every book, article, podcast, etc. I read or listen to says that networking is the best way for job search success. Yet most people spend a vast majority of their time searching and responding to online postings. It is time to break with “but everybody does it” and go rogue.

 

Begin moving out of your comfort zone. Reconnect with that cube-mate you had 10 years ago, find that roommate you had in college, locate the neighbor that moved away when you were in your starter home. It’s no telling where these people are now or how influential they may be. By the way, they may be wondering what you’re up to now also.

 

Go to coffee or have lunch and catch up, you’ll be surprised how natural it is once you get started. Ask how you can help them, networking is all about giving first.

 

Once you feel comfortable, begin making connections with the referrals you are getting, expand your sphere of influence, this is where the magic happens. These are the people who can introduce you to the decision makers in your target companies.

 

Don’t worry, just because you land your perfect job doesn’t mean you have to stop networking. This could be a lifetime of building connections that help you for the rest of your career.

 

Go rogue, just because the rest of the world is online, doesn’t mean you have to be stuck in front of a screen, go rogue and meet some real people.

 

On the lighter side, comments from real job applications…

 

Desired Position? Reclining. Ha, ha. But seriously, whatever’s available. If I was in a position to be picky, I wouldn’t be applying here in the first place.

 

Desired Salary? $285,000 a year plus stock options and a generous severance package. If that’s not possible, make me an offer. Obviously, I’m a desperate man.

 

Last position held? Target for middle management hostility.

 

Most notable achievement? My incredible collection of stolen pens and post-it notes.

 

Reason for leaving? Fired for stealing pens and post-it notes.

 

May we contact your current employer? If I had one, would I be here?

 

Do you have any physical conditions that would prohibit you from lifting up to 50 pounds? Of What?

 

Do you have a car? I think the more appropriate question here would be “Do you have a car that runs?”

 

What would you like to be doing in 5 years? Living with a wealthy super model in the Bahamas. But then, I’d like to be doing that now.

Rick ChristensenRick Christensen: Director, Career Transition Practice

Rick has been a career consultant for over 25 years, serving a very broad-based and diverse clientele. His specialties include effective group facilitation, one-on-one coaching and consultation at all levels including senior executives.

Rick’s passion is coaching individuals through career transitions, developing career management strategies and in identifying and sharpening competencies to open doors to new opportunities. His efforts have assisted thousands of individuals achieve their full potential.

Contact Rick at: Rick@CareerDevelopmentPartners.com